The King Bulletin

Screening Log: February 2014

Posted on Friday, May 30, 2014 at 8:01 pm by Danny King in the Screening Logs category

a short film about killing

[Click here for a reminder of the concept behind the "Screening Log" series.]

2/3: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Richard Fleischer, 1954) | DVD B- [Rail Piece]

2/5: Gaslight (George Cukor, 1944) | DVD B+

2/5: Possessed (Curtis Bernhardt, 1947) | DVD B-

2/6: After the Wedding (Susanne Bier, 2006/2007) | DVD D

2/6: The Girl in the Red Velvet Swing (Richard Fleischer, 1955) | DVD B+ [Rail Piece]

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Screening Log: January 2014

Posted on Friday, February 28, 2014 at 9:38 am by Danny King in the Screening Logs category

the master_6

[Click here for a reminder of the concept behind the "Screening Log" series.]

1/1: Assassin’s Bullet (Isaac Florentine, 2012) | Netflix Streaming C

1/1: Tuesday, After Christmas (Radu Muntean, 2010/2011) | Netflix Streaming B+ [Letterboxd]

1/2: The Brood (David Cronenberg, 1979) | iTunes B+

1/2: Fay Grim (Hal Hartley, 2006/2007) | Netflix Streaming B

1/3: The Blue Angel (Josef von Sternberg, 1930/1931) | MUBI Streaming A-

1/4: Man of Tai Chi (Keanu Reeves, 2013) | Amazon Instant Video B

1/5: Mon Oncle Antoine (Claude Jutra, 1971/1972) | MUBI Streaming A-

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‘Cocaine: One Man’s Seduction’

Posted on Monday, January 20, 2014 at 11:17 am by Danny King in the Reviews category

Letterboxd entry here. Twenty-one stills below.

cocaine seduction_1

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Screening Log: December 2013

Posted on Thursday, January 2, 2014 at 6:03 pm by Danny King in the Screening Logs category

gun crazy

[Click here for a reminder of the concept behind the "Screening Log" series.]

12/1: White Reindeer (Zach Clark, 2013) | Vimeo B+ [Review]

12/2: Out of the Furnace (Scott Cooper, 2013) | AMC Empire 25 C [Review]

12/4: Holy Motors (Leos Carax, 2012) | DVD B+

12/5: Faust (Aleksandr Sokurov, 2011/2013) | Film Forum B+

12/6: Inside Llewyn Davis (Ethan Coen, Joel Coen, 2013) | AMC Loews Lincoln Square 13 A- [Top 10 Capsule]

12/6: Dementia 13 (Francis Ford Coppola, 1963) | Amazon Instant Video B-

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Ralph Fiennes’s ‘The Invisible Woman’

Posted on Tuesday, December 31, 2013 at 2:42 am by Danny King in the Reviews category

the invisible woman

Over at Film International, I reviewed Ralph Fiennes’s The Invisible Woman, the actor-turned-director’s second effort behind the camera, after 2011′s modern-day Shakespeare adaptation, Coriolanus. “[If] the in-your-face immediacy of Coriolanus sometimes seemed hectic and derivative,” the review reads, “…the controlled, unhurried style of The Invisible Woman comes as a welcome and suitable shift in form.” Click here to read the whole thing.

‘Out of the Furnace’

Posted on Sunday, December 8, 2013 at 10:22 pm by Danny King in the Reviews category

out of the furnace

Over at The Film Stage, I reviewed Out of the Furnace, the sophomore film from Crazy Heart director Scott Cooper. The film has some admirable qualities—strong work from Christian Bale and Casey Affleck, an effectively desolate small-town atmosphere (the film is set in Braddock, Pennsylvania)—but I was ultimately left cold, mostly because the savage attention heaped upon Woody Harrelson’s Harlan DeGroat seemed extensive to the point of cruelty and sadism. There’s a real film somewhere in Out of the Furnace about two scarred brothers fighting to keep their lives together, but somewhere in the midst of it, Cooper started spending too much time devising this off-putting hillbilly-villain. Click here to read the review.

‘The Last Days on Mars,’ ‘White Reindeer’

Posted on Sunday, December 8, 2013 at 10:08 pm by Danny King in the Reviews category

white reindeer

I have two reviews over at Paste Magazine this week. First up, there’s director Ruairi Robinson’s feature-length debut, The Last Days on Mars, which, while occasionally interesting visually, never acquires any sort of narrative momentum or intrigue. Second, there’s writer-director-editor Zach Clark’s White Reindeer (pictured above), which I liked a good deal more. As with Clark’s previous two films, Modern Love Is Automatic and Vacation!, the film exhibits clear signs of a unique voice.

Gerwig/Spielberg

Posted on Thursday, December 5, 2013 at 6:44 pm by Danny King in the Uncategorized category

While reading these two pieces (both available online) this week, I stumbled upon this glorious contradiction, and figured it was too good not to share.

“What interests me more than anything else is the idea. If a person can tell me the idea in twenty-five words or less, it’s going to be a good movie.”

—Steven Spielberg, qtd. in Thomas Schatz, “The New Hollywood,” Film Theory Goes to the Movies, ed. Jim Collins et al. (London: Routledge, 1993), 33.

“Whenever you have an ‘idea,’ as in a concept that you could explain to someone, like a hook or at worst a gimmick, that is a bad thing. It feels good, but it’s not good.”

—Greta Gerwig, qtd. in Adam Sternbergh, “14 Screenwriters Writing,” The New York Times Magazine, November 25, 2013.

Screening Log: November 2013

Posted on Thursday, December 5, 2013 at 12:31 am by Danny King in the Screening Logs category

[Click here for a reminder of the concept behind the "Screening Log" series.]

11/1: The Beguiled (Don Siegel, 1971) | Netflix Streaming A- [Bright Lights piece]

11/1: The Last Contract (Kjell Sundvall, 1998) | BAMcinématek B-

11/1: The Ward (John Carpenter, 2010/2011) | Netflix Streaming B-

11/2: Alias Nick Beal (John Farrow, 1949) | Museum of Modern Art A-

11/3: Death Weekend (William Fruet, 1976/1977) | Film Society of Lincoln Center — Francesca Beale B

11/4: Drive, He Said (Jack Nicholson, 1971) | DVD B-

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Franco, Stallone, Statham

Posted on Monday, November 25, 2013 at 2:47 pm by Danny King in the Reviews category

A Sylvester Stallone-scripted revenge thriller starring Jason Statham and James Franco as, respectively, an ex-DEA agent and a trailer-trash meth dealer: 9 times out of 10, this lineup will make for an entertaining movie. Disappointingly, the Gary Fleder-directed Homefront turns out to be that lone outlier, a movie whose run-of-the-mill material is made all the more unsatisfying by the seriousness with which it’s treated. Click here to read the full review, posted over at The Film Stage.